The Deep End

For this weeks blog post I will be looking at the pattern called “The Deep End”. The context behind this one is that taking small safe steps leaves you unsatisfied and you are beginning to fear that you may be in a rut. Instead of diligence that could attain the next level you are in a rut where bland competence eventually will decay into mediocrity. The problem with this is that you need to grow your skills, confidence and portfolio of successful work. Challenging yourself with bigger things like bigger projects, larger teams and more difficult and complex tasks, new workplaces and more. This will again help you grow as a developer instead of settling for a rut. The solution to this is to jump in at the deep end, taking it head on almost. Waiting until you are “ready” can turn into a disaster or a pattern of never doing anything. When offered a higher profile role or a more difficult problem grab onto it with both hands take it head on. Personal growth will only occur if you are doing something out of your comfort zone and doing things that stretch your boundaries. This of course will have its risks without a doubt. If you get it wrong and way in over your head you could drown. But thankfully in the business there are many places where you can take risks without destroying your career if you were to fail. These risks are opportunities that will help you grow. It means taking a foreign assignment when its offered, even if the possibility of failure is staring in your face. Acting on this will be extremely beneficial to you when in a rut. Thinking of the biggest projects you have worked on and then writing down the answers to these questions pertaining to the difficulty of other projects is a good way to start. Using metrics to measure every project, in a sense, of your own projects. I find this pattern to be very on par with the be the worst mentality. In a sense you are putting yourself in an environment that may or may not cause you to fail miserably but if you succeed you will grow immensely.

Sanity Testing

Sanity Testing

As a follow, up to my Regression testing post a few weeks ago, Sanity testing is almost a subset of it because it is performed when we do not have enough time to do the testing. It is used to carry out the checking on whether the bugs reported in the previous build are fixed with regression being introduced to fix these issues not breaking any of the previously working functionality. Sanity checks to see if the functionality is working as intended/expected instead of doing the entirety of regression testing. The test helps avoid wasting time and cost involved if the build has failed. After the regression introduction has been completed Sanity starts to kick into full swing. With it checking the defeat fixes and changes done to the software application without breaking the core functionality. It is usually a narrow and deep approach to testing, needing to concentrate limited and main features of testing in detail. Sanity testing is usually non-scripted helping to identify the dependent missing functionalities. It is used to determine if sections of the application are still working after minor changes.  The objective of this testing is to not verify thoroughly the new functionality but rather to determine if that the developer has applied some rationality while producing the software. For example, if your scientific calculator gives the result of 2+2 = t! then there is no point in testing the advanced functionalities like sin 30 + cos 50. Sanity testing is usually compared to Smoke Testing which is used after software building is completed to ascertain the critical functionalities of the program is working fine. But smoke testing is for another topic for another day. All and all the website I looked at was very insightful into what sanity testing is and what it does.

https://www.guru99.com/smoke-sanity-testing.html

Visitor Design Pattern

Visitor Design Pattern

For this week’s blogpost I will be discussing another design pattern, this time I will talk about the Visitor Design Pattern discussed on Source Making’s website. Essentially the Visitor design pattern allows you to add methods to classes of different types without much altering to those classes. Allowing you to make completely different methods depending on the class used. Because of this you can also define external classes that can then extend other classes without majorly editing them.   Its primary focus is to abstract functionality that can be applied to an aggregate hierarchy of element objects. This promotes designing lightweight element classes due to the processing functionality being removed from the list of their responsibilities. New functionality can be added later easily by creating a new Visitor subclass. The implementation of Visitor beings when you create a visitor class hierarchy that defines a pure virtual visit() method in the abstract base class for each of the concrete derived classes in the aggregated node hierarchy. Form here each visit() method accepts a single argument – a pointer or reference to an original Element derived class. In short, each operation to be supported is modelled with a concrete derived class of the visitor hierarchy. Adding a single pure virtual accept() method to the base class of the Element hierarchy allows accept() to be defined to receive a single argument. The accept method also causes flow of control to find the correct Element subclasses, once a visit method is involved the flow of control is vectored to the correct Visitor subclass. The website listed below goes into much more detail into what exactly happens but here I summed it up so that most should be able to follow. But essentially the visitor pattern makes adding new operations easy, simply add a new Visitor derived class but if subclasses are not stable keeping everything in sync can be a bit of a struggle.

Example of Visitor Design Pattern

The example they use in the article is that based around the operation of a taxi company. When somebody calls a taxi company (literally accepting a visitor), the company dispatches a cab to the customer. Upon entering the taxi, the customer, or Visitor, is no longer in control of his or own transportation but the taxi driver is.

All in all, I thought this website was really good at explaining what the Visitor Design Pattern is. I have used this website before for previous research into design patterns and more.

 

https://sourcemaking.com/design_patterns/visitor